Aug 30, 2011

Yoshio Otomo Quartet - Moon Ray



barabara sounds sez:  
Back again to the j-jazz archives. This side from Yoshio Otomo is pretty rare, and TJ (below) rates it highly. And yes, maybe it is his "most important work". But I've got to say, it's really not one of my favorites from the TBM catalog. To me it sounds about a decade out of date: Whereas his label mates are pushing the fusion/free envelope, Otomo-san has his feet planted firmly back in the 60s. But that might be a recommendation for some people. Let your own ears be the judge... 

AMG (Thom Jurek) sez:
Otomo is an alto player from the Jackie McLean school of tone and the Art Pepper institute for improvisation. In other words, his tone has an edge, but he always phrases and improvises melodically. With Tsuyoshi Yamamoto leading the rhythm section, the other two members, Tamiko Kawabata on bass and Arihide Kurata on drums, had to be ever watchful and vigilant that these proceedings didn't escape them altogether. The set opens with the hard blues wing of the title cut by Artie Shaw. Otomo pushes his alto in the front line toward the lower register, establishing the feeling from the outset before going back up top for his solo. Yamamoto comps forcefully, rhythmically changing the modal interval from inside. It works, and swings as it echoes the blues of jazz yesteryear, though the emotion and sophistication of the players is unquestionable. The other tunes here, Johnny Mandel and Johnny Mercer's "Emily," Oliver Nelson's "Shufflin'," and Ralph Rainger and Leo Robin's "If I Should Lose You" are all played with grace and sensitivity. There isn't any over-teching anything -- a real temptation by Japanese jazzers in the '70s to sound authentic. This is as authentic as anything because the feeling is in the music. That comes through loud and clear on the only original of the set, "Love Comes Quietly," where Archie Shepp's dictum that you can hear every minute of every hour of every day a cat puts into his horn on a ballad: All men are fine soloists, and the melody itself is gorgeous, worthy of the rest of the company it keeps here. A great obscure reissue, and a fine introduction to Japanese jazz.

musicians:
Yoshio Otomo alto sax; Tsuyoshi Tamamoto piano; Tamio Kawabata bass; O "Jess" Kurata drums

tracks:
Moon ray; Emily; If I should lose you; Love comes quietly; Shufflin'

TBM 3007. rec. April 21/22, 1977 at Epicurus, Tokyo

12 comments:

bongohito said...

Fantastically appreciated! Well done....

bongohito said...

Fantastic selection! Well done. And thanks....

Anonymous said...

Finally and at last, here we go...
And apologies for the phantom appearance yesterday. Like the rays of the moon this post glimmered, vanished and finally has reappeared...

http://www.mediafire.com/?br448d05um4z37m

taro nombei said...

@ bongohito
you were quick off the mark there!
sorry to keep you waiting :-)

Bacoso said...

Nice one TN thanks as always !

the jazzstronaut said...

As always, many thanks Taro Nombei.

Arkadin said...

Thanks a lot TN, much appreciated!

Bender said...

Thanks a lot!

boogieman said...

Thanks TN, nice one. To me "sixties jazz in the Jackie McLean vein" could not be a better recommendation!
Have a good week end.

taro nombei said...

@ everybody
thanks for dropping round! glad this has found a few admirers...
always a pleasure :-)

Anonymous said...

f**k yeah. been looking out for that one for so long now. thank you so much for this and all the rare and other cool shit you share here.
it really is appreciated.

tom said...

Interesting opportunity to assay previously unknown-to-me, Yoshio Otomo. Thanks, Barbara, Moab's jazz audience at KZMU.org 7 - 9 Mountain will get acquainted with this artist in the coming weeks.